How does coronavirus spreads. EE&G

HOW DOES THE CORONAVIRUS SPREAD?

WHAT IS CORONAVIRUS?
Coronavirus 2019-nCoV, more commonly referred to in the media as the coronavirus or COVID-19, is a respiratory virus first identified in Wuhan, China suspected to have originated in a large animal and seafood market. Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses, some of which affect humans while others affect animals only. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is a different type of Coronavirus but is NOT the same as what is now being generally labeled “the Coronavirus”.

HOW DOES THE CORONAVIRUS SPREAD?
While we are still learning more about the new COVID-19 virus, scientists believe the virus will act similarly to other more well-known Coronaviruses such as MERS or SARS. It is believed that the coronavirus spreads from person-to-person when in close proximity to each other. The standard accepted distance is about six feet. The virus is spread much like the flu by an infected person coughing or sneezing. This introduces tiny respiratory droplets that can enter a non-infected person’s mouth, nose, or be inhaled into the lungs. As with other respiratory viruses, individuals are typically considered to be most contagious when they are demonstrating the greatest level of symptoms.

HOW DOES THE CORONAVIRUS AFFECT SURFACES?
Contaminated droplets settle onto surfaces that people may touch thereby contaminating their hands. If they touch their eyes, mouth, or nose before properly disinfecting their hands they may then become infected.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF THE CORONAVIRUS?
While the intensity of symptoms varies, with some individuals showing little or no symptoms and others demonstrating severe illness and even dying, the three main symptoms include;

• Fever (Above 101º F)

• Cough

• Shortness of breath

These symptoms may begin showing within two days of being exposed but may take as long as 14 days.

HOW CAN I HELP REDUCE THE RISK OF CONTAMINATION?
Knowledge is key to reducing the risk of infection from 2019-nCoV. The information included here is valuable, however, developments are made constantly so it is good to monitor official health channels such as the CDC.

Practicing good infection prevention practices, such as frequent hand washing, is also important especially in public buildings. These practices also include; properly cleaning and disinfecting surfaces, respiratory hygiene, and avoiding close contact with individuals. Most practices discussed in the media do NOT protect the individual using the practices, but rather protect others in the instance the person is infected. For example, using a mask does prevent airborne droplets from spreading if the individual wearing the mask coughs or sneezes, however, the coronavirus is small enough to enter through the mask to the wearer. Properly cleaning and disinfecting surfaces may be one of the only truly preventative measures available.

Seek medical attention immediately. Call your doctor or local hospital and explain your situation to them. With it being a prime season for the Flu and respiratory viruses, it is important to cooperate with medical professionals to reach a proper diagnosis. They may ask you some questions to help such as have you or anyone you have been in contact with recently traveled to China, answer these questions honestly.

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Experts Examining Potential Symptom Known as ‘COVID toe’

Experts say “COVID toe” is a condition similar to skin damage from exposure to low temperatures.

Northwestern Medicine dermatologist Dr. Amy Paller said in a statement that she had seen images of about 30 cases of the condition. She emphasized that it’s still unknown whether this is related to COVID-19 and more testing is needed.

“We’re seeing this inflammatory response that we would normally see when someone was exposed to the cold temperature… like someone who has been playing outside with wet socks,” Dr. Esther Freeman, a dermatologist at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, told CBS News. “However, in this setting, we’re seeing it in warm climates and we’re seeing it in patients who have been indoors and sheltering in place.”

Beginning as a “pinkish-reddish rash,” it can turn purple over time and causes a burning sensation in some people, Freeman told The Washington Post.

However, the inflammation typically disappears without treatment in 2 to 3 weeks, she added.

Los Angeles will offer free COVID-19 tests to anyone who wants one

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said the city will offer free tests for COVID-19 to all residents who want one. People don’t need to have symptoms to get tested, but those with symptoms will get priority.

Study finds airborne coronavirus in hospitals

A new study in NatureTrusted Source found that the virus that causes COVID-19 was detected in the air in certain areas of two hospitals.

The two hospitals in Wuhan, China are at the center of the outbreak in that country. Researchers found evidence of aerosolized SARS-CoV-2 in the toilet area and in areas prone to crowding.

The study has given more information about whether the virus is easily transmitted through the air. Researchers said proper ventilation and disinfection may help stop the virus from spreading in other similar areas.

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Free meals are donated to medical workers in New York City. Michael Nagle/Xinhua via Getty Images
FDA expected to allow emergency use of drug to treat COVID-19

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is expected to give emergency use authorization for the drug remdesivir to treat people with COVID-19.

The antiviral drug is being studied in multiple tests as a potential treatment for COVID-19. Early research has found that the drug may help people recover from the virus more quickly, according to the New York Times.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director for the National Institute for Allergies and Infectious Diseases, told the New York Times that administering the drug to people with COVID-19 may shorten their recovery time by about a third.

“Although a 31 percent improvement doesn’t seem like a knockout 100 percent, it is a very important proof of concept because what it has proven is that a drug can block this virus,” Fauci said. “This is very optimistic.”

However, more research will need to be done to understand what — if any — long-term benefit there is to taking the drug.

Another study from the Lancet found no benefit for patients taking remdesivir compared to patients taking a placebo.

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Coronavirus Outbreak – Children Just as Likely as Adults to Spread Virus

New studies find children are just as likely as adults to spread the new coronavirus. These early findings could make potential school openings especially fraught.

COVID-19

  • Globally, there have been more than 3.7 million confirmed cases and more than 260,000 associated deaths, according to Johns Hopkins.
  • The United States currently has the highest reported number of confirmed COVID-19 cases, with more than 1.2 million. However, due to a lack of testing, the number of actual cases may be far higher.
  • More than 70,000 people in the United States have died from the disease.

A German study, which is not yet published in a peer-reviewed journal, looked at 60,000 people with COVID-19 in addition to 47 children with the disease. The team found that children had just as much viral load or even higher amounts of viral load than some adults.

This early research focusing on how children can spread the virus could be pivotal in helping officials combat a second wave as some states weigh loosening shelter-in-place orders.

Another study out of China found that school closures drastically helped lower the transmission of the virus and lessen the severity of the outbreak.

“While proactive school closures cannot interrupt transmission on their own, they can reduce peak incidence by 40-60 percent and delay the epidemic,” the authors said.

Experts point out this is early research and more information is needed.

“Are any of these studies definitive? The answer is ‘No, of course not,’” said Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University. But, he said, “to open schools because of some uninvestigated notion that children aren’t really involved in this, that would be a very foolish thing.”